Patent Troll Narrative proven to be “Fake Views”

Patent Reform was intended to be in full effect before anyone noticed that like AIA it was based on false assertions by anti-patent academics including: a non-existent litigation crisis; a tax on innovation; alleged patent holder valuation inflation; alleged patent holder valuation inflation and; the so-called, diversionary, “patent troll narrative” which, for a while, completely captured congressional attention but now shares the top-of-mind limelight with “efficient infringement.

Unfortunately, this story’s destructive thrall appears still to have captivated SCOTUS and captured PTO. Congressional delay, however, gave us room to convince enough members that at least there were two sides to the story. That same delay has now given responsible parties in academia time to respond to the barrage of faux studies demonstrating a “need” to address waning (and otherwise explicitly addressable) troll abuses with the comprehensive litigation reform the efficient infringer lobby sought. Each of their promulgated academic “fake views” has now been refuted.

Actual and readily available facts debunk the so-called “volume crisis” in patent litigation. The “tax on innovation” most prominently promulgated was a thoroughly discredited “study” authored by Bessen and Meurer. (It is also attacked in this article but still quoted by duped anti-patent apparatchiks who have not yet realized how foolishly gullible they sound.) This past year USC economist Jonathan Barnett has been circulating a draft law review article before its final publication in the Berkeley Law Journal scheduled later this year and entitled “Has the Academy Led Patent Law Astray.” Barnett’s thoughtful analysis will be released this Fall in final form. In it, he conclusively demonstrates that previous patent reformer academic assertions about “royalty-stacking,” “patent hold-ups” and “patent thickets” were entirely speculative when released and since have been proven by empirical data to be completely false. Nevertheless, they still are contributing to the “depropertization” of patents. Here is an advance citation to what can only be referred to as “must reading”

Now we have a new and definitive debunking of the misleading “patent troll” narrative entitled, “Patents at Issue: The Data Behind The Patent Troll Debate” by Ashtor, Mazzeo and Zyontz. Like the detailed Barnett article, it is a “must read” for pro-patent advocates. It also discusses the counterproductive remedial implications of applying “liability theory” instead of “property theory” to patent ownership. Liability theory maneuvering led to the notorious Justice Kennedy anti-injunction concurrence in eBay.

Here is a quotation from the article’s “Background” explanation:

“The core questions in the “patent troll” debate include issues of whether and to what extent patent assertion practices take a toll on innovation, whether PAEs are asserting low-quality patents and seeking quick settlement payoffs, whether startups suffer more harm through patent assertions than the benefits they gain from patent market liquidity, and whether high litigation costs are shifting the economics of patent assertion to favor PAEs. These questions implicate the underlying tension between “patent monetization” and “patent assertion.” Which types of patent monetization practices are legitimate, and which types exceed the intended scope of the patent grant? Does “after-market” patent value extracted by PAEs deserve the same status as the patent value derived by practicing entities? More generally, should PAEs be entitled to property rule protection for their patent rights – should they have the right to exclude infringers – or should liability rules apply? In this paper, we seek to inform the policy debate about “patent trolls” and modern patent assertion practices by studying some of the key questions concretely, through empirical analysis of patent infringement award data.”

“Our findings reveal a number of important facts about PAEs and their patent assertion practices, some of which are directly contrary to popular positions in the “patent troll” debate. Rather, in some respects this data paints a very different picture of PAEs, showing them in some cases to assert patents and conduct litigation in ways that are highly similar to other patent– holders enforcing their rights. From the perspective of decided cases, it is very difficult to distinguish the “trolls” from any other patent plaintiff……

“On the whole, our findings suggest that the realities of PAE assertion practices are complex, and it is difficult to identify clear signs of abuse or misuse of their patents relative to other plaintiffs. Rather, the similarities we observe between PAEs and practicing entities highlight the risk that attempts to limit PAE’s enforcement rights or restrict the remedies available to them could inadvertently impact all patent-holders and cause adverse effects on the ability of practicing entities to enforce and otherwise monetize their patents. These results counsel caution in designing policies aimed at PAEs and patent assertion practices.

“Moreover, these results further indicate that modern patent assertion practices may yield unique efficiencies and benefits relative to traditional enforcement actions by practicing firms. We need to understand the relationship between modern patent assertion, patent monetization and patent value in its variety of forms before we can identify which practices “promote progress” and which prevent it. True “patent trolls” are difficult to find, and all patent rights are at issue in the hunt to apprehend them.”

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