Joe Allen’s Take on Price Controls

Whether the subject is Bayh-Dole price-based march-in or other government schemes to control the final pricing of privately developed products emergent from the commercially promising discoveries made possible by federally-funded life science research, Joe Allen knows what he is talking about. NIH’s mission is to see to the commercialization of such discoveries so they can become available to the public that invested in it through congressional R&D appropriations. Such curiosity-driven basic research is otherwise uninvestable. What cannot be commercialized cannot become available. This disconnect will lead to the further diminution of R&D funding for such research. However well-intended, governmentally imposed price controls deter private sector for-profit investment. This is not a theory. It is a historical fact confirmed by CRADA pricing experiment explained by Joe in his article below. Fast forward to the present. Joe’s conclusions are being confirmed now. The private sector investment withdrawals triggered by SCOTUS’ Mayo and Myriad decisions is happening now. These Sec 101 eligibility judicial missteps have created unacceptable uncertainty, not only in the life science areas treated in the actual decisions but regarding all life science “discoveries” the examiners and Courts are declaring unpatentable. Life science commercialization has never been more needed. It has never been more perilous.

As Joe Allen explains below there are better ways to skin drug pricing’s cat than crippling life science investment in applied development that is definitionally different than the hoped for curiosity-driven discoveries that made its profit-directed development possible.”Many in Congress want to impose price controls on medicines that result from

“Many in Congress want to impose price controls on medicines that result from federally funded research. We’ve tried this before, and it nearly brought medical research and development to a halt. Lawmakers aren’t wrong to want to lower drug prices, but they should find a strategy that isn’t a proven failure. These policies would have terrible ramifications for the future of National Institutes of Health-supported research and development while harming those suffering from the ravages of disease.Responding to congressional pressure in 1989, NIH officials incorporated a form of price controls known as a “reasonable pricing” clause in its licensing agreements. In short, they didn’t want to let private firms build upon publicly funded discoveries to commercialize resulting products unless the government had a say in pricing decisions. Their actions were well-intentioned. By placing conditions on medical patent licensing agreements, they hoped to decrease drug costs for consumers. But the results were disastrous.”

Here is Joe’s Fierce Healthcare article.

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