Patent Decline’s Top Causes and US Chamber’s Plea for Increasing its Strength

In his World Property Day post, IPWatchdog’s Gene Quinn predicts continued but not permanent decline for US patents after naming its three top contributors. His typically insightful prose pulls no punches and IMHO correctly identifies the decline’s legal culprits and their consequences. But in IMHO he fails to give due credit is to the influence of the ubiquitous Patent Troll narrative created first at Intel then brilliantly injected into the minds of congressional, SCOTUS and PTO lawmakers. Propagated by unsubstantiated law journalists’ speculations, bogus economist projections, misleading falsities to a lazy, uninformed press, occasional anecdotes and the over-anxious suspension of disbelief accorded to the Silicon Valley vanguard of the Information Age, its self-serving shiny object distraction penetrated DC policy top of mind. Its “litigation crisis” theme delivered it to sympathetic Judiciary Committee salons, an under-informed Supreme Court and a politically pliable PTO. Fueled by Amici blather Justice Kennedy’s injection of trolls into eBay blessed it. PTAB was presumably established to curb trolls. Mayo’s expedient nullifications based on expanded eligibility grounds reflect the story’s so-called “bad patents” allegedly wielded by patent trolls. The patent troll narrative was conjured to protect the efficient infringement that compelled the cut-throat competitive smartphone markets. Indeed, efficient infringement inevitably helped create them. The troll story masked efficient infringement and perpetuated because it has worked so well and will be needed still. Mega-tech wars among big tech peers may someday shift to cars and IoT. But big tech’s need to push down patented component costs and infringe their patents will remain. The troll narrative was an early avatar of alternative facts and fake news. It will be hard to extinguish. But until the troll story is snuffed out by targeted legislation and thoroughly debunked by public disbelief, today’s decline in patents will continue. Yesterday offering “the other half of the story” the US Chamber of Commerce issued a statement strongly supporting our economic need for strong patents saying:

“Over the past decade, a growing number of academic and industry researchers have been exploring the relationship between patent protections and innovations, particularly as it relates to technology startups. What they continue to find is that patents and other intellectual property protections are absolutely vital to supporting innovation; in fact, many of the technologies and innovations we take for granted today would never have come to bear without patents.”

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